The Practice of Network Security Monitoring

The Practice of Network Security Monitoring: Understanding Incident Detection and Response

Network security is not simply about building impenetrable walls — determined attackers will eventually overcome traditional defenses. The most effective computer security strategies integrate network security monitoring (NSM): the collection and analysis of data to help you detect and respond to intrusions.

In The Practice of Network Security Monitoring, Mandiant CSO Richard Bejtlich shows you how to use NSM to add a robust layer of protection around your networks — no prior experience required. To help you avoid costly and inflexible solutions, he teaches you how to deploy, build, and run an NSM operation using open source software and vendor-neutral tools.

You’ll learn how to:

  • Determine where to deploy NSM platforms, and size them for the monitored networks
  • Deploy stand-alone or distributed NSM installations
  • Use command line and graphical packet analysis tools, and NSM consoles
  • Interpret network evidence from server-side and client-side intrusions
  • Integrate threat intelligence into NSM software to identify sophisticated adversaries

There’s no foolproof way to keep attackers out of your network. But when they get in, you’ll be prepared. The Practice of Network Security Monitoring will show you how to build a security net to detect, contain, and control them. Attacks are inevitable, but losing sensitive data shouldn’t be.

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2 thoughts on “The Practice of Network Security Monitoring

  1. Stephen Northcutt

    Best book in the network monitoring genre yet If you are in cyber security this is a must read. It starts off with a preface by Todd Heberlein, the guy who started the craft of network monitoring. Richard spares us the rehash of things like the TCP 3 way handshake and jumps into actionable content very quickly. The book is the best resource for tools I have seen anywhere. The charts, diagrams, and screen shots bring the information to life. It was particularly great to see the focus on Security Onion.The favorite part for me…

  2. Michael W. Lucas "author, network engineer"

    You must read this book Most computer books are badly written. The information in the book is fine (usually, hopefully), but the actual craft of writing is poor. They read like computer programs. This isn’t surprising, as most computer books are written by computer professionals. By the time you’re good enough at a computing topic to write a book about it, your brain automatically arranged things in machine-friendly order. That’s human nature. The downside of this, however, is that most computing books lack the things…

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